Skip to main content

About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
SFGTV2 104
SFGTV 40
KPIX (CBS) 6
CSPAN 5
CSPAN2 5
FBC 3
KGO (ABC) 3
KOFY 2
KQEH (PBS) 2
WJZ (CBS) 2
KICU 1
KRCB (PBS) 1
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 1
MSNBC 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 187
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 187 (some duplicates have been removed)
, resources, and resolve of all in our city by engaging faith leaders to join in the broader effort to end violence in san francisco. mayor lee recognizes a precious resource that could be the effective key to realize our success on this issue. at the same time he challenges us to respond to a moral obligation that is at the core of our mission as communities of faith. he also reminds us of our history. there has been no civil rights or human rights movement in which the faith communities and its leaders have not been at the forefront and i look at dr. and he is a living reminder of that truth. at the heart of civil rights movement in the years 1963 and 1964 before there was a san francisco interface council there was the san francisco conference on religion, race and social concerns which for 25 years was the voice of social justice in the city and county of san francisco. it was that movement that gave birth to the san francisco interfaith council whose mission it is to bring people together of different faiths, to celebrate our diverse spiritual and religious traditions, build unde
could all give them a big round of applause so my name is shady and i work with themary's city ever services here in city call hall and i want to welcome great a i think this thure we programmed over ten institutions in the city of san francisco including the air film festival the arab culture and committee center but also with the tamp pais public library to have two events showcasing the rich arab america culture that exists here in the city of san francisco and i want to thank you all for coming and i want to introduce joaquin for resident who ska great member of our community and has helped organize this event. (applause). . thank you very much and good evening everyone on behalf of mayorly who will be joining us in a few moments i want to say thanks to all of you for being here tonight it's always a pleasure for you go to welcome the community into city hall - because you remind us our purpose in government so to serve and you you certainly bring life and culture and community into our very state halls and bring life to us, so thank you again. i want to thank the nominating com
were coming here to 34 years ago to the steps of city hall. and she wrote this as an anthem, coming 34 years ago to the steps of city hall. so, holley nears, we are angry people. ♪ we are gentle angry people and we are singing, singing for our lives we are gentle angry people and we are singing, singing for our lives we are here together and we are singing, singing for our lives we are gay and straight together and we are singing, singing for our lives we are [speaker not understood] speaking people and we are singing, singing for our lives we are [speaker not understood] speaking people and and we are singing singing for our lives we are a land of many colors and we are singing singing for our lives we are a land of many colors and we are singing singing for our lives we are gentle angry people and we are singing singing for our lives we are gentle angry people and we are singing singing for our lives ♪ [cheering and applauding] ♪ >> hello and "welcome to meet your district supervisor. we're here with david chiu from district 3. that includes chinatown, fisherman's wharf, and pa
really hard with organizations like sf city and code for america and others to make sure that we keep being leaders in technology and celebrating our status, but also implementing the programs to help us continue that very nice title we have, the innovation capital of the world. and i am here today in collaboration with board president david chiu and so many others from our committee on information technology, spur, our different various city departments, really trying to improve on what we've done already. back in 2009 then mayor gavin newsome to the light of all of us had introduced that we ought to really establish some guidelines to open up our city's data. and in the year later, the board, less legislation, the first open data legislation in san francisco that made us cutting edge throughout the country, the first to come out and say to everybody in the public, to people who wanted to create businesses, wanted to look at the city with kind of an open invitation to involve themselves with what the city had. and part of that really neat understanding was that we were holding o
with the city the past few weeks to try and consume some of the data that's a part of the data sf data repository and tell a story about urban growth. so, this is a mapping platform that allows you to not only visualize your data like you see here, but also ask questions of your data. and i'm pulling data from multiple data sources. here we have data from the city. we also have data from private data sources that read -- not going to mess with it. there's one of the variables now, the bottom you see there is median household income. we're pulling in all these different data sources, creating a beautiful visualization to tell a story at the neighborv level of how the city is growing. and some of the things you're seeing on the map here are a pipeline of information about both residential permits over the past decade or so, how has the city allocated permits throughout different neighborhoods in the city. and some of the other things you're seeing on the map is the approved businesses, the businesses are currently doing business in the city. one of the things we said once we started visu
sources, creating a beautiful visualization to tell a story at the neighborv level of how the city is growing. and some of the things you're seeing on the map here are a pipeline of information about both residential permits over the past decade or so, how has the city allocated permits throughout different neighborhoods in the city. and some of the other things you're seeing on the map is the approved businesses, the businesses are currently doing business in the city. one of the things we said once we started visualizing on the map the slow and more rapid growth of residential -- residential property in soma and then in 2011 you just saw obviously a huge residential boom in the downtown area. so, we've just actually -- we're a company in southern california. we just relocated up here, small little office in san francisco, trying to better understand the community moving at a fast pace here. part of doing that is working with the city and better understanding how we can support open data. so, thank you. (applause) >> good morning, everybody. can you hear me? good morning and welco
to put on events like this that add to the cultural life that we all enjoy in this great city. so so thanks to them. [applause] and in a way that's what we're here to talk about this afternoon, the triumph of this city and all the cities, the triumph of the city, that's the title of harvard economics professor ed glaeser's book. it's about what's made cities around the world great, about the challenges that they have had to overcome and still face. we're going to talk about b that in a few minutes in the special context of this city with our panel, and we'll take questions from you as well later. but, first, to launch us off with a presentation, here's the author, professor ed glaeser. [applause] >> thank you. thank you, bob. and thank you all so much for being here. i'm so enormously flattered that you've decided to take time out of your saturday afternoon to come and talk about, about cities. i'm also particularly grateful to the boston book festival for including this book. i, like i think every single one of you, love books, and i'm just thrilled to be part of this amazing thing
within our city contracts that the companies that do service for us do not own the data that they generate from us, that they will have a contractual obligation to share that with the city so that we can mine that to the rest of the city, that's advance of opportunities for everybody. i know at the heart of sharing this data, there is going to be a lot more jobs created, a lot more people out therein venting new ways to establish small businesses that will improve the way we live and work and play in the city. and we look forward to great events like a super bowl host or something like that, we're going to be able to give people a really rich amount of programs that they could access from here to santa clara to san jose. we can act regionally with our data and we can join and continue to be in the great city of san francisco. so, i want to thank all of the people, all of the different starting up companies here and those that are inventing with us, thank them for celebrating innovation month in such a exemplary way. and i think we're going to have a lot more to announce
and constituent trends are happening in our neighborhoods * ? that data is there to be shared with our city planning. so we can plan for the future and make sure when we're not planning to limit the kind of growth that we want to encourage. >>> and then we've got another exciting one. chris haug is here and the company hundred-plus is here today. they have worked on, for many years, health related data. and they're going to roll out the opportunity where people can get information about what exists in our city that they can utilize or go to that will affect their health in a positive way. for me, i'm looking at an apparatus that will be on my wrist that will tell me every time i should go to the golf course. [laughter] >> because that's where my exercise happens. the more i walk on the golf course like i did 18 holes yesterday morning at 6:00 a.m., the more healthy i'm going to be in the long run. it's things like that where people don't know there might be an existent location that they don't know about that could be related to their health. and they could have that instantaneously. >>> th
the way we live and work and play in the city. and we look forward to great events like a super bowl host or something like that, we're going to be able to give people a really rich amount of programs that they could access from here to santa clara to san jose. we can act regionally with our data and we can join and continue to be in the great city of san francisco. so, i want to thank all of the people, all of the different starting up companies here and those that are inventing with us, thank them for celebrating innovation month in such a exemplary way. and i think we're going to have a lot more to announce before this month is out, including on our way to the world series. thank you very much. (applause) >> now, if i may introduce our partner in crime here, board president david chiu who is also going to be complimenting us with all of his efforts at the board. come on up, david. (applause) >> good morning. i am incredibly excited to be here today for a couple of reasons. first of all, the hatchery is one of my favorite places in the city. there is truly a bee hive of activi
of any major city in the country. i want to thank my colleague scott wiener for helping to showcase the importance of the other nine to five economy. the impact of all that you do has an impact on our job situation and local economy, and to highlight all of the great work that we can do together to ensure that the sectors that you all represent, the sectors that you work for, that you employ people for connaught is one of the greatest sectors in san francisco. i hope we will take the opportunity of the america's cup to showcase our clubs, our restaurants, our nightlife events. as someone who represents the broadaway neighborhood, an area of town that i used to spend a lot of time in when i was in my 20's -- but actually, very few locals take the time to head to the beach on broadway. our neighborhoods are coming together to say that broadway is open to the rest of the world as well as san francisco. i want to put san francisco back on the map when it comes to music. to make sure that we have the type of entertainment that we used to be renowned for. and those of you that work in our
is down. a variety of entertainment is what makes our city great. we will touch on the upcoming party legislation -- party bus legislation and a safe place for our youth to go. after our panel discussion will have some regard groups so we can share ideas and brainstorm. we have a very luminary panel here. right now, i would like to introduce our cheap -- chief of police. [applause] >> good afternoon. i also am not john newlin, and i have less hair than him. [laughter] is a pleasure to be here for the second year. there are fewer people here. that might be because it has been a good year. as audrey suggests i believe that is because of partnership is up. we want to be a police department that you are comfortable calling before anything happens with out fear of having us say, no, we are going to shut it down. we want to work with you to make it happen, but it means as safely as possible. certainly, alcohol always played a role as well as the age of the patrons, and on and on. again, please give us a chance to further develop the trust that we have been building over the last several yea
to support the life and the growth of the city. philadelphia, throughout the 19th century, was the major industrial city of the united states. all of these industries used water from this system. and it served as a prototype for many american cities, including pittsburgh and new york. man: new york city went to philadelphia and said, "you know, we're thinking of developing a hudson river water supply -- what do you suggest we do?" and they said, "we've had "a lot of problems on the schuylkill. "don't go to the hudson river. go to the upland and work by gravity." and that's what new york city did. they first went to the hudson highlands, but 150 years later, it went to the delaware highlands. and really diverted the water that normally went to philadelphia to new york city. i don't think they anticipated that. narrator: the majority of new york city's drinking water comes from watersheds in upstate new york. a watershed is the area of land where water from rain or snow melt drains downhill into a body of water. mountains act as a funnel to feed rivers and lakes. and in this case, reservoi
for this arab heritage month celebration here in city hall they are p g and e. eleven narrow and bar two. many many of the media outreach worked throughout the community to make sure that people were in union square at the celebrations and if he is activities. (applause). yes mis. >> i was fortunate enough to join the opening of the festival at the castro theater and i can't thank them enough for making us all aware of that work as well and,phd has been a kind sponsor with the coffee which we all know keeps us awake and ice -- which keeps us well well fed. yes, please give it up. and we all know the work that takes place, here to allow all of us to enjoy the city like this could not be wad without a very strong organizing work of our planning committee and so to all of you i want to say thank you again again and particularly again to shad dee alcarra. who's-who really has been a beakon of energy inside of our office at the mayor's office and neighborhood service and is sweating through our work to make sure we are well on point to have a great celebration here at city hall and so again sha
scale and complex engineering. man: water is essential to the economic viability of new york city. reliable infrastructure and reliable delivery of water is a must. you have to reinvest in the infrastructure every single minute to keep it current. hurwitz: we have the stock exchange, we have the united nations -- failure can have a dramatic impact on the nation, and even internationally. so there's a really keen awareness that you always have to be fixing the system. things corrode, they rust. they get to where you turn them on and nothing happens. but it is so totally used in every nook and cranny, that making any accommodation to shut it down, to do something to it, is very difficult. narrator: two massive underground tunnels, called simply tunnel 1 and tunnel 2, provide most of the city's water supply. they run hundreds of feet below manhattan, far deeper than the subways. built at the beginning of the 20th century, they are concrete-lined and bored through solid rock. they could last centuries. but the mechanical equipment within them will not. engineers in the 1950s discovere
and tunnel 2, provide most of the city's water supply. they run hundreds of feet below manhattan, far deeper than the subways. built at the beginning of the 20th century, they are concrete-lined and bored through solid rock. they could last centuries. but the mechanical equipment within them will not. engineers in the 1950s discovered rust on the tunnel's valves. there were concerns that if they closed the valves for tunnel inspections, they may never open again, leaving new york city without water. so they chose to keep them open. as a result, there has not been significant inspection, maintenance, or repair of the tunnels in decades. no one knows their current condition. hurwitz: currently, city tunnel 1 and city tunnel number 2 would be feeding each half of the city. so you'd lose half the city if you didn't have a replacement. narrator: without half of its water supply, the city would shut down. for nearly 40 years, new york has been in the process of constructing a solution. man: this project is water tunnel number 3. we started on this project in 1969. i'm a sandhog. i've been a sandho
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 187 (some duplicates have been removed)